What Exercise Works Your Adductors?

To aviod a knee injury, keep your knees behind your toes

To aviod a knee injury, keep your knees behind your toes

You can perform hip adductor exercises with or without a machine. Three nonmachine exercises you can perform in the comfort of your own home are side lunges, resistance-band hip adduction, and bottom leg lifts. If you prefer to go to a fitness facility to strengthen your adductors, there are seated and standing hip adduction machines. Always be sure to consult your physician prior to starting a new exercise program.

Side Lunges

No equipment is required for side lunges, which means you can do them anywhere. To perform the side lunge, start in a standing position with your legs together. Take a step to the side and bend the knee of the leg you stepped out with. When bending your knee, make sure you keep your hips back and weight on your heels so your knee does not go over your toes. Then, push back up to the starting position by straightening the bent leg. Once you are standing back up with your legs together, lunge to the other side. Although equipment is not required, if the exercise is not challenging enough try holding dumbbells or any other weighted object to make it more difficult.

Resistance Band Hip Adduction

To perform hip adduction exercises with a resistance band, first tightly secure the resistance band to the bottom of a sturdy object, such as a squat rack or the leg of a heavy table. Then secure the band to your foot that is closest to the object the band is connected to. Stand so there is no slack in the band, then spread your legs by taking a step away with the leg that is not attached to the band. To perform the exercise, pull the banded leg in toward the other leg, then slowly spread your legs back apart to the starting position. Perform the same number of sets and repetitions with each leg. This exercise is great because there are different ways you can make it more or less difficult. One simple solution is to stand closer to the attached object for less difficulty, and stand farther away for added difficulty. Also, you can purchase bands that come in different levels of resistance.

Bottom Leg Lifts

You can do bottom leg lifts while lying on the floor watching television. Start by lying on your side with your bottom leg straight and your top leg bent, resting your foot in front of your bottom knee. Slowly adduct, or raise the bottom leg toward the ceiling, then slowly lower it back to the ground. Roll over to your other side and perform the same exercise using your other leg. It is normal that your leg will not rise very high.

Seated Hip Adduction Machine

This exercise is a great option because it is not as time consuming as some other exercises, since you are using both legs at the same time. To use the seated hip adduction machine, sit on the seat with the knee pads on the inside of each knee. Adjust the machine so your legs are spread as far as possible. Keeping your chest out and shoulders back, squeeze your legs together then slowly spread them back apart. Keep your movements slow and controlled throughout the entire exercise.

Multi Hip Machine

One exercise that can be performed on the multihip machine is hip adduction. Adjust the machine so the pad is at an angle in which you can stretch your leg up so the inside of your leg is resting on the pad. Stand on the platform with the pad on the inside of one of your legs and grasp the handles at your sides. Standing straight, adduct the leg by pulling it in toward the other leg. Then switch sides and perform the exercise with the other leg. Although you will be holding onto the handles at your sides, if you have trouble balancing on one leg it might be safer to use the seated hip adduction machine.

 

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About the Author

Jacquelyn Slater is a certified strength-and-conditioning specialist and group fitness instructor. Slater earned a Bachelor of Science in exercise science from Slippery Rock University and a Master of Sciece in health and fitness from the University of Pittsburgh. She currently serves as the health and wellness director at the Titusville YMCA.

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