How do I Find Nursing LPN Jobs in Petersburg, VA?

LPNs averaged $40,380 in 2010, according to the BLS.

LPNs averaged $40,380 in 2010, according to the BLS.

Licensed practical nurses, or LPNs, play vital roles in the growing health care industry. They provide support to the physicians and registered nurses they work with by doing such things as taking vital signs, changing bandages, providing basic care for their patients and evaluating patient recovery. Becoming an LPN involves completing a certificate program at a local community college, usually lasting one year, and taking the National Council Licensure Examination to obtain a license. The job outlook is great for LPNs -- a growth of 22 percent is expected through 2020, says the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics -- so finding a job in Petersburg, Virginia, shouldn't be very difficult.

Online Job Banks

Job bank websites such as careerbuilder.com and monster.com attract a multitude of employers seeking qualified applicants. Even Petersburg's newspaper, The Daily Press, has an online classified section that links to a job bank. Searching for work on these sites is easy. Try all forms of LPN to get the best results: licensed practical nurse, licensed vocational nurse, LPN and LVN. You can also choose how many miles outside of Petersburg to search.

Inquire Locally

Contacting the human resources department of Petersburg's hospitals is another good way to explore LPN vacancies. A quick search on Google provides the phone numbers and addresses of three area hospitals: Central State, Poplar Springs and Healthsouth Rehabilitation. A good number of private doctor's offices are in the Petersburg area as well. Making a quick round of inquiries can help you track down good leads.

Submit Your Resume

Creating a solid resume is the next step in landing a job. Your resume should stress your strengths, experience, education and achievements that will benefit your potential employer. Resumes should cover the basics, such as your personal information and contact numbers, as well as when you received your LPN license and from where, and who your previous employers are. Non-nursing employment can be included if it you believe it adds clout to your resume. If you had a high GPA in school, mention it. The point is to represent yourself as a strong candidate who is capable of handling the job the employer is trying to fill.

Nail the Interview

Ninety-nine out of 100 job rejections are the result of a poor interview, according to "Forbes." Making a good impression is vital to securing the role you're after. Prepare yourself and make sure you understand the job. Practice the interview with a friend, answering questions you believe might come up. Dress appropriately for the interview, show up on time and listen calmly. One mistake interviewees make is being so eager to answer that they miss the point of the question. When you do answer questions, make your answers concise. Before you leave, find out the steps to the hiring process, such as whether another interview must be conducted, and ask any intelligent questions you might have. When the interview is over, send a thank-you note to your interviewer within 24 hours.

2016 Salary Information for Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses earned a median annual salary of $44,090 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses earned a 25th percentile salary of $37,040, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $51,220, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 724,500 people were employed in the U.S. as licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses.

 

About the Author

Brooke Julia has been a writer since 2009. Her work has been featured in regional magazines, including "She" and "Hagerstown Magazine," as well as national magazines, including "Pregnancy & Newborn" and "Fit Pregnancy."

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