How to Gain Respect As a New Supervisor

Set a positive, professional tone.

Set a positive, professional tone.

Making a good impression whether hired or promoted into a supervisory position is key. Your employees will respond to how you set the tone for your management style. Earn your team's respect by modeling professional behavior. If you come across as snobby or superior, you're more likely to attract your staff’s disdain than earn their respect.

Introduce Yourself

Be personable yet confident when you introduce yourself to your staff. Provide background information about yourself, particularly with regard to your education and supervisory experience. This establishes your credibility and lets your staffers understand you know what you're doing. Meet with employees one-on-one to get to know them as individuals and begin establishing rapport.

Establish Expectations

Let your staffers know from the beginning what your management style is. If you have a particular way you plan to manage your team, be clear and lay out guidelines for everything; explain how schedules are made or vacation time determined to when time cards are handed in and absences dealt with. Letting employees know what you expect sets the groundwork for a healthy, respectful working relationship.

Be Accessible

Your staffers must know they can count on you when they have issues or concerns. Be accessible to your staffers and encourage them to talk to you by having an open door policy. Communicate regularly, in person, through email, written updates and reports. Take staffer concerns under advisement, solicit input when appropriate and treat everyone in a professional and equitable manner.

Model Behavior

Behave the way you want your staffers to behave. Arrive on time or ahead of schedule for work, dress professionally and perform your job functions without complaint. Don't abuse your authority, take excessive breaks or show favoritism among your staffers. Talk respectfully about the company and speak in positive terms about your own manager.

Show Staffers Respect

Treat your staffers with respect and common courtesy in all you say and do. This will demonstrate that while you hold a position of authority, you're also a fair and gracious supervisor who is intent on doing a good job. Encourage staffers to challenge themselves to do their personal best. Acknowledge contributions, recognize good performance and handle conflict and problems promptly and fairly.

 

About the Author

Lisa McQuerrey has been a business writer since 1987. In 1994, she launched a full-service marketing and communications firm. McQuerrey's work has garnered awards from the U.S. Small Business Administration, the International Association of Business Communicators and the Associated Press. She is also the author of several nonfiction trade publications, and, in 2012, had her first young-adult novel published by Glass Page Books.

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images