When I Am Leaving a Job, Is It Okay to Tell About My New Job?

Be respectful and professional when sharing your news.

Be respectful and professional when sharing your news.

Moving on to a new job can be an exciting undertaking, one you’re naturally enthusiastic about and want to share with others. When done professionally, telling your colleagues and even clients about your career move can help you maintain professional relationships that will be beneficial down the road.

Telling Your Boss

Don’t start bragging to your colleagues about your new job before talking to your boss in private. Write a formal letter of resignation and give your boss at least two weeks time to find a replacement. Your boss might ask you why you’re leaving or where you’re going. It's fine, and even appropriate, to let your boss know about the new opportunity you're pursuing. This is especially vital if you're staying in the same industry where your paths are likely to cross again in the future.

Telling Your Colleagues

Just like it's a good idea to stay on good terms with your boss for future networking purposes, it's fine to let your colleagues know where you're going after you break the news to your supervisor. Be careful in how you approach your news with co-workers so you don't come across as bragging, being excited about “ditching this dump” or otherwise behaving in an unprofessional manner. Don't get so excited about preparing for your new job that you fail to work your final two weeks. It’s important to wrap things up to make your departure easier on your colleagues.

Telling Clients

If you have an employment contract with a non-compete clause, check with human resources about whether you can tell clients or customers about where you’re going. If you’re taking a job with a competitor, your employer might not want you to tell them where you're going in the fear they'll leave and go with you. Find out what your company's policy is about communication between staffers and clients after notice is given.

Potential Downsides

If you’re leaving your current job because you don't get along with a colleague or your boss or you feel you've been treated unfairly, talking about a new job can backfire and make your final weeks at work miserable. Likewise, if you're going to work for the competition, it can create animosity with your co-workers, particularly if they see you as a trader or defector. You're under no obligation to tell anyone where you're going.

 

About the Author

Lisa McQuerrey has been a business writer since 1987. In 1994, she launched a full-service marketing and communications firm. McQuerrey's work has garnered awards from the U.S. Small Business Administration, the International Association of Business Communicators and the Associated Press. She is also the author of several nonfiction trade publications, and, in 2012, had her first young-adult novel published by Glass Page Books.

Photo Credits

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