How to Write a Resume for an Assistant Nurse Manager Position

An assistant nurse manager's resume should cover her nursing and management experience.

An assistant nurse manager's resume should cover her nursing and management experience.

When writing a resume for an assistant nurse manager position, highlight your nursing experience, your experience managing other people and your professional accomplishments. Avoid using a chatty, personal tone and don’t oversell yourself. Saying that you’re a highly sought-after super nurse may leave a prospective employer cold and uninterested in learning more.

Profile and Qualifications

Begin your resume with your name, address and contact information, and include your licenses and degrees after your name. Below your name and contact information, include a one- to three-sentence profile. Your profile should highlight your strengths, such as years of experience, and showcase some of your qualifications. Avoid including personal information (marital status, children or pets.

Work History

Think of your profile as the appetizer and the work history section of your resume as the main course. Start with your current or most recent job and include its name, the dates of employment and your title. Include your responsibilities as well. For example, you may want to note your experience hiring, training, disciplining and firing staff, collaborating with a hospital’s administration or with a nurse manager, working as a patient advocate or developing programs to reduce or eliminate workplace accidents.

Accomplishments

For each job, list at least one accomplishment or achievement, such as creating or helping to implement a quality-improvement program. Other accomplishments might include overseeing staff compliance with regulatory and professional standards of care like those set by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations or serving on a patient-satisfaction committee.

Education

In the education section of your resume, list the schools you’ve attended and the years you were there, the degree you earned and any honors you received. Also list any professional associations you joined, such as the American Nurses Association or the American Medical Women’s Association. If you’ve earned specialized certifications, list them here as well. New graduates with little work experience can augment their resumes by listing professional activities they participated in while in school.

Activities and Achievements

Conclude with a list of your current professional associations, articles you’ve published and other professional activities you’ve participated in, such as conferences. This information demonstrates your willingness to get involved in activities indirectly related to the core requirements of the position. You can also list training materials or courses you’ve developed and policies you wrote or revised.

 

About the Author

William Henderson has been writing for newspapers, magazines and journals for more than 15 years. He served as editor of the "New England Blade" and is a former contributor to "The Advocate." His work has also appeared on The Good Men Project, Life By Me and The Huffington Post.

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