Weight Lifting for a Bigger Butt

Lunging increases muscle size in your butt.

Lunging increases muscle size in your butt.

Weight training will help you fight against the sagging and weakness that many women get in their butt when they sit too long at work or in school. While you can't change your natural frame and bone structure, training three to four days a week for as little as 30 minutes in each training session can give you curves in your butt worthy of admiration. Be sure to combine your workout with a balanced diet and enough rest to give you the best results.

Kettlebell Deadlift

Stand with your feet about shoulder-distance apart and put a 35-pound kettlebell between your feet on the floor. Bend your knees slightly and hinge your torso at your hip to grab the kettlebell's handle with both hands. Shift your weight slightly toward your heels.

Exhale sharply as you push your hips forward and straighten your legs, bringing your torso upright and the kettlebell off the ground. Do not shrug or curl your arms.

Inhale as you lower the weight to the floor by bending your knees slightly and your hinging your torso forward. Do not flex your spine. Do two to three sets of eight to 12 reps.

Dumbbell Squats

Stand with your feet about shoulder-distance apart, and hold a 15-pound dumbbell in each hand over and close to your shoulders. Keep your elbows close to your ribs.

Inhale as you squat down as low as you can, keeping your heels on the ground and your feet and knee pointing forward or slightly turned out. Keep your spine upright without flexion.

Exhale as you stand straight up. Do two to three sets of eight to 12 reps.

Kettlebell Swings

Stand with your feet about shoulder-distance apart and hold a 25-pound kettlebell with both hands with your arms extended down in front of you.

Hold the kettlebell's handle firmly as you rock your hip back and forth to generate momentum for the swing. Inhale and swing the kettlebell between your legs once you gain enough momentum. Bend your knees slightly and hinge your torso forward at your hips as you swing. Do not flex your spine throughout the exercise.

Exhale sharply as you push your hip forward and straighten your legs to swing the kettlebell up. Do not swing higher than your shoulders. Repeat the swings as fast as you can for two to three sets of 10 to 20 swings.

Box Jumps

Stack a set of aerobic steps between 2- to 3-feet-high. Stand close to the steps with your feet about hip-distance apart.

Swing your arms forward as you jump on top of the steps. Land gently on your toes and the balls for your feet with your feet about hip-distance apart.

Jump forward immediately and land gently on the floor in the same manner as you did on the steps. Do not hunch your back when you land. Turn around and repeat the exercise for three to four sets of six to 10 reps.

Reverse Lunges

Stand with your feet together and step back with your right foot about 2 feet behind you.

Lunge down until your right knee gently touches the floor. Do not extend your left knee pass your toes.

Exhale as you stand up and step forward with your right foot to the standing position. Do two to three sets of eight to 10 reps per leg.

Items you will need

  • Stack of aerobic steps
  • Two 15-pound dumbbells
  • 35-pound kettlebell
  • 25-pound kettlebell

Tip

  • For the best results, do two or three exercises consecutively without rest between sets. This method, called a complex, provides a higher stimulus for your muscles to growth as they adapt to the exercise stress, says strength coach Robert dos Remedios, author of "Cardio Strength Training." For example, you can do the deadlift, swing and reverse lunges for the recommended number of reps. Rest for two to three minutes and do another one or two sets. Use a lighter weight if you cannot perform the exercises with proper form or the recommended number of reps. Use a heavier weight if you can do the exercises easily.

Warning

  • If you experience pain anywhere in your body, do not start any workout routine until you have checked with your health care provider. Work with a qualified fitness professional if you are new to weight training.
 

References

About the Author

Nick Ng has been writing fitness articles since 2003, focusing on injury prevention and exercise strategies. He has covered health for "MiaBella" magazine. Ng received his Bachelor of Arts in communications from San Diego State University in 2001 and has been a certified fitness coach with the National Academy of Sports Medicine since 2002.

Photo Credits

  • Photodisc/Valueline/Getty Images