What Do You Wear to a Vet Assistant Interview?

Wear comfortable, professional clothes that allow you to work with animals.

Wear comfortable, professional clothes that allow you to work with animals.

Congratulations on passing your veterinary assistant training! Once you've sent off a few resumes and received a callback or two, decide what you'll wear to your interviews. Unlike other job interviews, veterinary assistants may have to perform a few hands-on tasks, making typical business interview attire too dressy. Instead, think business casual and comfort in case you have to demonstrate how to properly bathe an animal or express a dog's anal glands -- two messy chores a veterinary assistant often performs.

Main Dress

Skip the business suits and skirt-blazer combos. Wear a coordinating outfit that doesn't restrict mobility or the ability to work with an animal. Avoid low-cut blouses or fabrics that snag easily. Instead, choose a collared or button-down top, slacks and minimal accessories to add style to the outfit. Pick solid colors or small patterns, such as pinstripes, that aren't distracting.

Accessories

Keep accessories minimal and useful. An easy-to-read, all-weather wristwatch is helpful if you must demonstrate during the interview how to take an animal's pulse or time a procedure. Wear only a wedding ring, as decorative jewelry may get in the way. Choose small, stud-style earrings and avoid long necklaces or bracelets. A lightweight neck scarf can add a pop of color to the outfit, and you can easily remove it if necessary.

Footwear

Close-toed shoes are best. These keep you safe and comfortable during the interview. Avoid heels and opt for a basic ballet flat or dressy leather shoe. Although the job may require sneakers or clogs, treat the interviewing process as a professional meeting by not wearing everyday, worn footwear.

Grooming

If you're interviewing for a large-animal vet assistant position, keep grooming in mind. When working outdoors, you want your hair to stay put. Tie back long hair in a bun or clip. Fingernails should be a very modest length and groomed short to keep animals comfortable during internal exams.

 

About the Author

Angela Tague writes marketing content and journalistic pieces for major brands including Bounty, The Nest, Lowe's Home Improvement and Hidden Valley. She also provides feature content to newspapers and writes health and beauty blogs for Daily Glow, Everyday Health and Walgreens. Tague graduated from the University of Iowa with a bachelor's degree in journalism and mass communications in 1999.

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