Walk & Weight Loss Plan While Working 40 Hours Per Week

Walk to work whenever possible.

Walk to work whenever possible.

When you work 40 hours per week, the best weight-loss plan is to get in the exercise wherever it fits. Creativity is a must, as well as discipline and scheduling. Co-workers may not agree with your motivation, but it is up to you to be an example of how it is possible to walk and lose weight while holding a full-time job.

Creativity

Walk as much as possible throughout your day. If your commute to work is minimal, consider walking to work instead of driving. If you must drive, park your car far back in the parking lot or at the parking lot next door. Take the stairs instead of the elevator and walk to co-workers to communicate instead of using the phone.

Walking Breaks

Turn your lunch break into a walking break and encourage your co-workers to join you. Instead of talking and catching up while eating, do so while walking around the building. Bring a pair of walking or running shoes if you typically wear business attire to work. Save a few minutes at the end of the walk to eat lunch before returning to your desk.

Intensity

Monitor the intensity of your walk. Leisure walking will burn minimal calories compared to speed walking or power walking. Determine you maximum heart rate by subtracting your age from 220. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends an intensity level of 50 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate to produce weight-loss results. For example, a 20-year-old would have a maximum heart rate of 200; multiplied by .50 to have an intensity of 50 percent, her target heart rate would be 100. Her pulse should maintain 100 beats per minute during her walk.

Follow a Sensible Diet

To lose weight, you must burn more calories than you consume. If your job does not provide sensible and healthy food choices, bring your own snacks and lunch. To save on time, prepare all your meals at the beginning of the week and store them in the freezer until you are ready to bring them to work.

 

References

  • ACSM's Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription; American College of Sports Medicine

About the Author

Ronny Marie Martin is a certified personal trainer through the American College of Sports Medicine and a certified group exercise instructor through the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. Martin began writing articles in 2009 and is the fitness contributor for "Urban Views Weekly." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision/Digital Vision/Getty Images