How to Use Ski Tow Hooks

A solid towline connection keeps waters skiing fun and safe.

A solid towline connection keeps waters skiing fun and safe.

Skimming across water’s surface on anything is loads of fun. Before setting out for a day of water sporting fun, you must familiarize yourself with the equipment used to pull people safely behind a boat. Ski tow hooks simplify the connection between a towline and the back of a boat, but you need to know exactly how the two pieces of equipment connect. Connecting them incorrectly will change your day from fun to frustrating.

Towline Inspection (Personal Experience and Tip No. 3 of Reference 3)

Set one end of your towline in your hand. Close your hand loosely around the line, leaving the end loop hanging past your palm. You want to grip it tightly enough that your palm and all fingers contact the rope, but loose enough that the rope stills pulls through your hand.

Inspect the loop hanging past your palm. Grab the loop with your free hand and pull the rope slowly. Inspect each inch of the rope as it comes out of your hand. Look for small nicks and tears. You will feel some of the damage as the rope travels through your closed grip. As the rope slides, feel for thin spots in the line. Line stress can the rope to become thin. Thin spots can break, ruining your fun day on the water.

Watch the color of the line during your inspection. Ultraviolet light will cause thin spots in the line’s sheathing. These light areas can signify weak areas of the towline.

Connect Towline to Ski Hook

Grasp one of the towline’s end loops with your hands.

Lay the loop over the ski hook, with the tip of the loop facing the boat’s bow. The towline will be lying on the ground or in the water.

Push the end of the loop opposite the knot end inside the tow hook. Slide the loop over the tow hook’s center pin. Push the loop over the pin, and pull the towline to tighten the loop to the post.

Inspect the connection. The end of the loop will be tight to the center post and run outside of the hook, placing the sides of the loop along the outside of the hook’s body.

Items you will need

  • Towline
 

About the Author

Lynda Schwartz is a fitness professional who began writing in 2004. She has contributed to "Women's Day" and "Good Housekeeping" magazines, as well as covered fitness and well-being for online publications. Schwartz holds a bachelor's degree in exercise science and health promotion.

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