Stretching Exercises for the Arm Between the Shoulder & Elbow

Overbuilding your upper arms can affect range of upper arm motion.

Overbuilding your upper arms can affect range of upper arm motion.

The upper arm consists of two key muscles, the biceps and the triceps. The biceps muscle is located on the front of your upper arm. It enables you to raise your arms overhead, bend your elbows and turn your palms up. In the back of your upper arm is the triceps muscle. This muscle allows you to straighten your elbow and push up from the floor. Stretching your upper arms can improve your flexibility and prevent injuries from repetitive sports’ movements.

Overhead Stretch

Bend your left arm. Grab your left elbow with your right hand. Slowly bring your left arm behind your head until your left hand touches your back at the midpoint between your shoulder blades. Press your left elbow down farther until your feel the stretch in your left triceps. Hold the position for a few seconds. Repeat the stretch with your right arm.

Arm Across Shoulder

Stand on a firm surface with your body upright, feet apart, knees slightly bent and toes pointing out. Gasp your upper left arm with your right hand. Extend your left arm so it aligns parallel with your shoulder. Push your left arm across the front of your body and toward your right side. Hold the pose for a few seconds before performing the stretch on your right arm.

Reach Back

Stand with your back to a wall and your feet shoulder-width apart. Reach straight back with both arms as if you're grabbing a rope in each hand to pull a wagon forward. Place your hands against the wall at shoulder height, forming a right angle to your torso. Your hands and elbows should face upward. Keep your arms straight. Lean forward slightly to avoid straining. Slowly bend your knees until you feel a stretch in your biceps. Hold the stretch for a few seconds and return your arms to the starting position. Repeat five times, resting 10 seconds between each stretch.

Press Down

Find a hip-high stationary platform, such as a stationary bicycle or a banister. Position yourself about an arm’s length away from the support. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Keep your knees slightly bent. Lean over at your hips so your back is perpendicular to your body and parallel to the floor. Avoid rounding your back. Place your hands on the support platform. Straighten your elbows and move your pelvis back. Allow your weight to shift to the backs of your heels. Contract your abdominal muscles as your upper arms settle into the stretch. Hold the stretch for about 10 to 60 seconds. Avoid straining or bouncing in the exercise.

 

About the Author

Kay Tang is a journalist who has been writing since 1990. She previously covered developments in theater for the "Dramatists Guild Quarterly." Tang graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in economics and political science from Yale University and completed a Master of Professional Studies in interactive telecommunications at New York University.

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