How to Stop Workplace Drama

Workplace drama negatively affects the amount of work that gets done in an office.

Workplace drama negatively affects the amount of work that gets done in an office.

Virtually every business endures some type of workplace drama, whether it's employees who gossip or compulsively lie about their family life to garner attention and sympathy. But negativity in the workplace can be offset by workers and managers with a little communication and a lot of persistence and discipline.

Don’t be a part of the problem – become a part of the solution. For example, if your co-workers are standing around the water cooler gossiping, steer clear and head for your work desk. Work doesn't get done when everyone is standing around chit-chatting.

Single out the employees with issues and speak to them individually about problems they are causing. Meet privately to spare them the embarrassment of being called out in front of their co-workers.

Remind those who work in your department of their job roles and responsibilities. If employees have too much time on their hands and are causing problems, give them more responsibilities.

Set workplace boundaries. For example, no gossiping or talking about others in the office and leave family and personal issues at the door.

Actively discipline employees who are causing disturbances. For example, an employee caught spreading lies about another employee will receive one day unpaid suspension from work. Increase the severity of punishments for repeat offenders.

Communicate with your employees that workplace drama has to stop because it is affecting productivity. Let them also know that in some cases customer service can be harmed.

Seek help from other administrators if you can't get your employees in line. You may have to dismiss repeat offenders.

Warning

  • Always be fair when accessing employees. Never punish one person and not the other for the same offense.
 

About the Author

Based in Nelsonville, Ohio, Felicia Nelson has been writing since 2007, covering a variety of business and personal finance topics. She is pursuing a bachelor's degree in digital communications at Franklin University.

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