Sprinting Up Hills for Toning

Sprinting hills will increase your speed on flat surfaces too.

Sprinting hills will increase your speed on flat surfaces too.

If you want a toned backside, run for the hills, and don’t stop when you get there. Sprinting up hills tones your glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves. And contrary to flat ground, hill sprinting especially focuses on your behind muscles. Plus, if you do it regularly, it will give you more endurance and enhance your speed when you return to flat surfaces. To see results, aim for at least three times a week of hill sprinting.

Warm up by walking quickly or jogging for five minutes on flat ground.

Sprint up a hill as quickly as you can. Concentrate on breathing steadily. Focus your eyes on the top of the hill, since this will naturally give you better posture. Move your arms as you run.

Walk down the hill. Then, sprint up the hill again. Repeat this sequence eight times.

Cool down by walking quickly or jogging for five minutes, but not on a hill this time.

Stretch your calves. Sprinting up hills puts even more strain on your muscles, so don't skip the stretches. Step backward with your left leg. Bend your right knee and keep your left leg straight. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg.

Loosen your glutes. Lie on a mat on your back. Place your right ankle on the top of your left knee. Pull your left thigh toward you with both hands. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Stretch your quads. Bend your right knee, bringing your right foot toward your behind. Hold onto your right foot with your right hand. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Don’t forget about your hamstrings. Sit on the floor with your legs extended out in front of you. Point your toes to the ceiling. Reach your arms toward your toes, trying to keep your legs straight. Hold for 30 seconds.

Tip

  • You can do this workout on a treadmill too by walking at a 1 percent incline for four minutes and at a 4 percent to 8 percent incline for four minutes; repeat the sequence eight times.

Warning

  • Talk to your doctor before starting any exercise routine.
 

About the Author

Though constantly traveling the world, Julia Williams is based in Chicago and has been writing since 2006. Williams holds a Bachelor of Science in accounting. She is also a licensed fitness instructor, specializing in Pilates since 2003 and has written hundreds of articles on exercise and health.

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