On Which Side of the Shirt Do You Put the Name Tag?

Ideally you should wear your name tag near your right shoulder.

Ideally you should wear your name tag near your right shoulder.

Whether you're networking for a job or at an industry event for business purposes, your name tag and its placement can have an important role in helping you succeed. Name tags help identify who you are and make the introduction process more effective if placed at the upper right side near your right shoulder, according to IVC, an international relations organization.

Placement

The placement of your name tag to the upper right side of your right shoulder is a prime location given it’s the closest point to eye level, aside from your head. Also, whenever an introduction takes place, you commonly put out your right hand, which allows contacts to view your name tag more easily as they look at your extended arm for a handshake.

Legible

Your name needs to be legible on a name tag. It should use a large font size so that you name is visible several feet away. Using dark ink like black or blue and starting with a capital letter followed by lower case letters for your first name and last name will help make it more legible. If your name's long, break up the first name and last name into two lines.

Interference

Avoid clothing that may interfere with the placement and visibility of your name tag. Often, name tags may include a clip or pin, so ensure your blouse or suit jacket is supportive of the name tag placement. You want to avoid any neckwear or flaps that may end up covering the name tag. If you have hair longer than shoulder length, keep it brushed or tied away from your name tag.

Credentials

Depending on the event, your name tag may indicate a formal or informal title. For instance, if you have a Ph.D., determine if you should add Dr. or Ph.D. to your name or leave it out. At an event where you're trying to seek job opportunities in clinical research, you may want to add credentials like a Ph.D. at the end of your name. If you're attending an event where you meet with young children who may not understand Ph.D., having Dr. before your name or just your name itself would serve you better.

 

About the Author

Wendy Lau entered the communication field in 2001. She works as a freelance writer and prior to that was a PR executive responsible for health care clients' written materials. Her writing experience include technical articles, corporate materials, online articles, blogs, byline articles, travel itineraries and business profile listings. She holds a Bachelor of Science in corporate communications from Ithaca College.

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