How to Show You Are an Extrovert During an Interview

Extroverts tend to be lively, passionate people.

Extroverts tend to be lively, passionate people.

Even the most confident, self-assured people can get the jitters before a job interview. But if you’re planning to interview for a job that requires extroversion, such as in sales or marketing, you must harness those butterflies to put your best face forward. Think of your mission as displaying passion for your chosen career, and the rest should fall right into place.

Display confident and friendly nonverbal cues. Shake hands firmly, look directly at people when you speak and smile.

Exude a sense of physical energy by showing good, erect posture, gesturing mildly and nodding when it’s appropriate to do so. While you don’t want to be seen as lethargic, don’t go overboard, either. In other words, don’t shout, gesture wildly or move about erratically.

Keep the volume of your voice at a robust level. Vary the pitch as the conversation shifts topics to avoid a monotone drone.

Comment on your interviewer’s statements, which will require you to listen carefully. Extroverts tend to be talkers, but don’t feel as though you must fill every gap in conversation.

Illustrate your points with examples, especially those regarding your past work accomplishments. In the parlance of writers, this means that you should show, not tell.

Ask open-ended questions. Extroverts tend to be curious people who are interested in others. Keep your questions relevant by asking the interviewer what she likes most about the company or about the most pressing, forthcoming company projects.

Tip

  • Read the job description before the interview and focus on those elements that truly excite you. By “kick-starting” your passion in this way, your extroversion should rise right to the surface.
 

About the Author

With education, health care and small business marketing as her core interests, M.T. Wroblewski has penned pieces for Woman's Day, Family Circle, Ladies Home Journal and many newspapers and magazines. She holds a master's degree in journalism from Northern Illinois University.

Photo Credits

  • George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images