Shoulder Stretches for the Backswing

Extra shoulder rotation can add yards to your drives.

Extra shoulder rotation can add yards to your drives.

Golfers are always looking for that little extra edge -- perhaps a few more yards off the tee, or something to help keep the ball on the fairway. In addition to improving your technique, don’t ignore the benefits of loosening up your body. Improving your shoulder flexibility, for example, will help you make a full backswing and add some zip to your shots.

Stretch with Driver

Warm up for five to 10 minutes before you stretch. Choose from a variety of light aerobic activities, such as walking, jogging or jumping jacks.

Stand erect your feet about shoulder-width apart and your knees slightly flexed.

Grasp a driver with your right hand and hold it at your side. Place the head of the driver on the ground so it’s a bit forward of your toes.

Reach over and place your left hand on the butt end of the grip. Reposition yourself, if necessary, so your left arm is straight.

Bend from the waist and drop your head forward and down until you feel a stretch in your left shoulder and side.

Hold the stretch for at least 10 seconds.

Repeat the exercise on your other side.

Seated Club Stretch

Warm up for five to 10 minutes before you stretch. Choose from a variety of light aerobic activities, such as walking, jogging or jumping rope.

Sit in a chair or the edge of a bench.

Hold a club horizontally behind your back, using the insides of your arms. The club should rest against your elbows or your lower biceps.

Turn your upper body slowly to the right about 90 degrees. Try to touch your left hand to your right thigh to deepen the shoulder stretch.

Hold the stretch for 30 seconds.

Return to the starting position, then repeat the stretch in the opposite direction.

Items you will need

  • Golf club

Tip

  • Warming up before you stretch raises your blood temperature and, as a result, literally warms your muscles. By increasing your metabolic rate, warming up makes your muscles more flexible so they can stretch farther, with less risk of injury.
 

About the Author

M.L. Rose has worked as a print and online journalist for more than 20 years. He has contributed to a variety of national and local publications, specializing in sports writing. Rose holds a B.A. in communications.

Photo Credits

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