Is it Safe or Hard on Knees to Wear Ankle Weights While Rebounding?

Rebounding involves the use of a small trampoline.

Rebounding involves the use of a small trampoline.

Rebounding is a form of aerobics that involves doing exercises on a small trampoline. Rebounding is designed to be easy on the joints, especially the knees. Although using ankle weights may not drastically increase the impact on your knees, it can lead to other forms of injury, and there are alternatives you can explore to burn more calories. You should talk to your doctor before modifying any part of your exercise routine to make sure it is safe.

Rebounding Basics

Rebounding is a form of aerobics that was invented over 50 years ago. It involves performing many basic exercise movements on a small trampoline, usually in a group setting. One research study that found that the cardiovascular benefits from rebounding were similar to those from exercising on a treadmill. However, because rebounding is considered to be a "low-impact" form of exercise, with much of the impact is absorbed by the trampoline, it may help prevent injuries to joints, making it an effective form of exercise with a lower risk of injury to joints.

Ankle Weights

Working out with ankle weights involves wrapping a weighted band around your ankle. These weights force your legs to support more weight, which can increase strength and muscle tone, Fit Day notes. One of the advantages of ankle weights is that they are designed to be naturally incorporated into any workout routine, so they can be worn while rebounding without requiring you to modify your workout. Fit Day recommends them for people who have recently suffered lower body injuries and are trying to begin a new exercise regimen.

Safety

One of the main benefits of rebounding is that it helps to minimize the risk of overuse injuries to the lower body. However, as Dr. Laskowski at the Mayo Clinic website notes, ankle weights can increase the risk of leg muscle strain and ankle injury. While these weights are not noted to directly impact the knees, the resulting fatigue may cause your body mechanics to change during your routine to compensate for the additional weight. In addition, Dr. Gabe Mirkin notes that using ankle weights will strengthen your quadriceps without a corresponding increase in hamstring strength, which can also lead to leg injuries.

Alternatives

Dr. Gabe Mirkin recommends keeping weight training separate from aerobic activities, such as rebounding. The main advantage of wearing these weights while rebounding is that they will cause your muscles to tire more quickly, but there are other ways to give your muscles more of a workout. Simply doing the exercises more quickly or going for longer periods of time will increase the intensity of the exercise without increasing your risk of injury. If you are interested in increasing leg strength, Dr. Laskowski recommends other options, such as doing exercises with resistance tubing.

 

About the Author

Adam Cloe has been published in various scientific journals, including the "Journal of Biochemistry." He is currently a pathology resident at the University of Chicago. Cloe holds a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry from Boston University, a M.D. from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Chicago.

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