Pushup Techniques Focusing on the Triceps

Show off your newly toned arms in your favorite sleeveless dress.

Show off your newly toned arms in your favorite sleeveless dress.

Toned arms are high on the workout priority list for many women -- especially if under-arm flab is one of your problem areas. Although fat loss cannot be targeted to a specific part of the body, strength training exercises tone and define your muscles. Pushup exercises tone your triceps -- the muscles on the back of your upper arms, hiding under the flab. All types of pushups will strengthen your triceps, however research conducted by the American Council on Exercise indicated that the triangle pushup technique -- also called diamond pushups -- specifically focuses on your tricep muscles.

Lie on your stomach on a firm surface. Bring your hands together under the center of your chest.

Make a triangle with the tips of your index fingers at the top, and thumbs tip-to-tip forming the base. For a diamond pushup, angle your thumbs downward and touch them tip-to-tip to form the base of a diamond.

Keeping your knees straight, position your legs hip-width apart and bend your ankles, resting the tips of your toes on the floor. Push down through your palms and straighten your elbows, keeping your legs and trunk straight. This is your starting position.

Slowly bend your elbows, lowering your chest toward the floor. Tighten your abs and buttocks to help keep your legs and trunk straight. Stop when your chest is 4 to 8 inches from the floor.

Hold for two to three seconds, then push back up into the starting position. Repeat 10 times and work up to three sets in a row.

Tip

  • Look at the floor while you perform this exercise to avoid injury to your neck muscles. Perform this exercise with your knees bent and resting on the floor if it is too difficult.
 

About the Author

Aubrey Bailey has been writing health-related articles since 2009. Her articles have appeared in ADVANCE for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine. She holds a Bachelor of Science in physical therapy and Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University at Buffalo, as well as a post-professional Doctor of Physical Therapy from Utica College. Dr. Bailey is also a certified hand therapist.

Photo Credits

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