Proof-of-Employment Letters

Employment letters typically detail your job profile.

Employment letters typically detail your job profile.

A proof-of-employment letter basically verifies, "Yep, this person works here." Although they can be used used for numerous purposes -- such as proving you make enough money to buy your dream house -- employment letters all pretty much follow the same template, with few variations. Give your boss at least one week notice if you need an employment letter, since she may need time to pull your personnel record for specific details.

Double-check all the details needed for your proof-of-employment letter, since you’ll want to give your supervisor accurate information to work with. The amount of information required will depend on the purpose of your letter -- letters for citizenship or child-adoption purposes, for example, might require more details than letters for apartment rentals or a mortgage loan. Basic proof-of-employment letters typically include the name and job title of the employee and length of employment. Other details may be required, including the date of hire, description of duties, employee salary, employee schedule and anticipation of continued job status.

Explain to your employer that you need a letter, and provide a summary -- in writing -- detailing exactly what you need the letter to say. If your employer is busy, he might ask you to create a template letter for him to review and sign.

Request that your proof-of-employment letter be printed on official company letterhead to lend the letter authenticity. Make sure the letter is dated, and that your supervisor signs his name in pen directly above his typed signature. Also ask your boss to include his direct work-contact information, for verification purposes.

Make a copy of the letter for your personal records before distributing it to anyone else. Anything could happen -- the letter could get lost in the mail; or if you deliver it by hand, lost in the flow of office correspondence. If the letter is to be sent electronically, print and save a hard copy for yourself.

 

About the Author

Oubria Tronshaw specializes in topics related to parenting and business. She received a Bachelor of Arts in creative writing from the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, and a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from Chicago State University. She currently teaches English at Harper Community College in the Chicago area.

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