How to Parallel Slide With Rollerblades

A helmet and other protective gear will help reduce the risk of injury when attempting to learn new skills.

A helmet and other protective gear will help reduce the risk of injury when attempting to learn new skills.

A parallel slide is a way to stop quickly on rollerblades without using a brake; it is sometimes referred to as a two-skate stop. Its name is derived from the fact that your rollerblades are parallel to each other while you are sliding to a stop. This is very similar to the way hockey players stop quickly on the ice, except it is more difficult because you don’t have the smoother surface of the ice and you can’t scrape off the top layer of asphalt or concrete. Learning the proper technique is of utmost importance to avoid falling.

Skate slowly in a straight line on a smooth and level paved surface.

Begin coasting in a straight line and bend your knees.

Turn both rollerblades sideways so that they are perpendicular to the direction you are traveling. Shift your weight back away from the direction of travel and bend your ankles sideways so that the sides of your rollerblades opposite the direction of travel are lower to the ground. Keep your arms up to help keep your balance.

Use your last bit of momentum to shift your weight to a normal standing position as you stop with your toes still facing the same direction you changed to while doing the parallel slide.

Items you will need

  • Rollerblades
  • Helmet and other protective gear

Tips

  • If you fall back opposite of the way you are traveling, then you are keeping too much weight back or are waiting too long to shift your weight forward to a standing position. If you fall forward over your skates, your weight is too far forward or you are popping up too soon, which is more dangerous. If anything, it is better to fall back to err on the side of caution.
  • Adjust how far apart you keep your legs when stopping based on the surface. The smoother the surface, the farther apart you will want to keep your legs to help with keeping your balance. A smoother surface also will mean a longer stopping distance is required.

Warning

  • Always wear a helmet and other protective gear when rollerblading, especially when attempting to learn new skills.
 

About the Author

Darin McGilvra has been a professional writer since 1997. He was a copy editor for several California newspapers, including "The Sun" in San Bernardino, the "Inland Valley Daily Bulletin" in Ontario and the "San Gabriel Valley Tribune" in West Covina. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in math education from Northwest Nazarene College in Nampa, Idaho.

Photo Credits

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