I Need an Excuse to Quit My Job

It's time to quit if your job bores you to tears.

It's time to quit if your job bores you to tears.

You're sick of working on projects, calling customers and coping with your annoying coworkers, and you're beginning to wonder if you should quit your job. You might be worried what your boss, family, friends and future employers will think if you simply quit without reason. If you're ready to throw in the towel, you can give your employer a legitimate reason that fits your situation. When you give a reason instead of an excuse, it's more honest and you won't burn bridges in case you need to return.

You're Bored and Unchallenged

Your job isn't going to be exciting all the time, but if you're bored more often than not, it may be time to move on. Boredom is a sign that your job isn't challenging you, allowing you to practice your skills or teaching you anything new. If you like working at your present company, ask your boss for more responsibilities or extra training. If your company is too rigid to allow this, start looking for something new. Give your boss the reason that you're looking for a challenging job more suited to your skill and experience level. Even if she hates to lose you, she will respect your honesty.

You've Found Something Better

If you were recently offered a position with another company that pays more and offers more benefits than your current job does, it makes sense to move on. If you'd rather not leave your current job but it's just not paying the bills, telling your boss that another company is willing to pay you more might spur her to give you a raise, especially if you're talented and she wants to keep you on the team. If your boss can't give your a raise, tell her the reason you're quitting is because you need a higher salary or you've found another job.

You Hate Your Co-workers

Everyone has arguments with coworkers, but serious altercations can make for a very unenjoyable workplace. If someone at work repeatedly bullies you or picks on you because of your race, gender or religion, you're probably ready to leave. If you don't really want to leave your job, complaining about the bully to your boss may yield results. If your boss is the one doing the bullying, however, it might be best to start job hunting. Workplace relationships can be fun for a while, but eventually, they usually come to an end. If you dated a coworker and the relationship ended badly, coming to work is likely very stressful. If you need to work closely with your ex and you can't stand him, transfer to another department or quit and move on. When you quit, give the reason that you and another coworker are having interpersonal problems. If the boss is the problem, buff up your courage and tell him the truth.

You're Having a Huge Life Change

If you're moving to another city or state, you may have no choice but to quit your job. If you're having a baby, you might choose to turn temporary maternity leave into full-time stay-at-home motherhood. This is a good choice if you want to spend more time with the baby or don't want to send her to daycare. Furthering your education is a reasonable excuse for quitting your job, especially when you're taking a full load of classes. When you finish your degree, you'll be even more employable and able to command a higher salary. When your boss asks why you're quitting, tell her about the life change and say that you won't have time to work at the company anymore. Or, if you're moving, tell her you'll live too far away to commute.

You Want to Start a Business

You may have dreams of running your own business, working from home and being your own boss. If you have the financial backing to support yourself during the business's start-up period, you might be ready to quit your job and run things your way. Be aware, however, that quitting your job means giving up a secure, steady paycheck and health insurance, at least temporarily. When you put in your two-week notice, give the reason that you're launching a new business and need to quit so you can focus all your attention on it.

 

About the Author

Melissa King began writing in 2001. She spent three years writing for her local newspaper, "The Colt," writing editorials, news stories, product reviews and entertainment pieces. She is also the owner and operator of Howbert Freelance Writing. King holds an Associate of Arts in communications from Tarrant County College.

Photo Credits

  • Comstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images