List of Positive Qualities in the Workplace

Keep morale high with a positive attitude instead of a sour outlook.

Keep morale high with a positive attitude instead of a sour outlook.

Are you an enthusiastic, demonstrative creative force, or a reserved, analytical technical expert? Do you thrive under intense pressure or prefer a steady pace? Is multitasking your middle name, or are you a list-making, one-thing-at-a-time organizational whiz? While each of these work styles has a place in the office, certain positive qualities make every manager's best-of-breed list. So, while the marketing genius in the colorful necktie yelling down the hall might seem like the polar opposite of the reclusive, khakis-wearing network administrator, they probably have more in common than you think.

Communication

Quintessential Careers notes that although some jobs require certain expertise, every employer seeks candidates who demonstrate competence in "soft" skills. Tops on the list is communication, whether written, verbal or listening. The ability to make points clearly and, sometimes, tactfully, is essential for job effectiveness and workplace harmony. Listening carefully prevents mistakes and misunderstandings. And, understanding the nuances between when conciseness versus details is necessary keeps work momentum moving forward instead of at a standstill.

Problem Solving

It doesn't matter if you're an administrator, a teacher, a physician or a computer programmer; everyone, every day, has to solve some sort of problem. Employers identify as key the ability to identify a problem, name its causes and resolve them successfully as an essential workplace skill. Quintessential Workplace notes that highly valuable employees not only solve problems, they scrutinize and streamline the processes that cause them, thus reducing the likelihood that they will occur in the future. Take pride in your work. Leave the office each day knowing that you did your level best to keep your organization moving forward.

Time Management

It's no secret that the 2012 economy has left many employers -- and employees -- doing more with less resources. As a result, employees who shoulder differing responsibilities must understand how to manage their time effectively. Prioritizing tasks successfully and adapting quickly to fluid working conditions are highly valuable traits to employers. Whether you accomplish this through extensive list-making or keeping many balls in the air at once matters not; what counts is the ability to get things done right, and preferably, the first time.

People Skills

Even if you're a crack technical expert, you manage your projects with laser-like efficiency and you are a creative problem-solving genius, if you treat your coworkers like garbage, chances are you won't be employed for long. Treat your colleagues with respect. Listen to their ideas carefully, without interruption. Accept responsibility for your own mistakes instead of blaming others. Inspire those around you to action. And though staying focused on the end goal is important, remember that stepping on toes to get there will only damage morale. In short, practice the golden rule by treating others the way you wish to be treated yourself.

 

About the Author

Lisa Bigelow is an independent writer with prior professional experience in the finance and fitness industries. She also writes a well-regarded political commentary column published in Fairfield, New Haven and Westchester counties in the New York City metro area.

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