Knee on Elbow Yoga Pose

Knees on elbow pose strengthens your abs, arms and wrists.

Knees on elbow pose strengthens your abs, arms and wrists.

The Knee on Elbow yoga pose, also known as Crane pose, is one that requires upper body and arm strength as well as balancing skills. You may need to work on it, but don't let that keep you from giving it a try, especially if you want to work on strengthening your arms, wrists and even your abs. When balancing with your knees on your elbows, you'll also be opening your hips and groin and stretching your upper back. It will take a few attempts before you're able to maintain the pose, but it will get easier with practice.

Crouch down into a low squatting position. Your heels will be close together, your toes v'd slightly apart. Your knees should be wide apart, wider than your hips. Your torso should be leaning forward slightly so that it's between your thighs.

Bend your elbows slightly and place your hands on the floor on either side of your feet. This part of the pose is a little awkward because your arms will be in between your legs with your shins resting against the outside of your arms, and your knees just above your elbows.

Raise up onto your toes. Slowly lean forward as you lift up, gradually lifting your feet entirely off the floor to support your body with your arms. Exhale as you lift your feet off the floor.

Keep your knees bent and in place just above your elbows. It will help you balance if you round your back and try to bring your tailbone close to your heels. Breathe in once you are successfully balanced.

Try to hold the pose for at least 20 seconds. As you become better at it, hold it for longer periods, up to one minute.

Lower yourself slowly to bring your feet back to the floor, exhaling as you do so.

Tips

  • Women who have carpal tunnel syndrome should avoid the Knee on Elbow pose as it will put stress on your wrists and aggravate the condition. "Yoga Journal" also advises pregnant women against performing the Crane pose.
  • If you have a hard time lifting off the floor when you first try this pose, start by using a block to squat on. This helps out by starting your feet a few inches off the floor.
 

References

About the Author

Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since 1990. She began working in the fitness industry in 1987, and her experience includes editing and publishing a workout manual. She has an extended family of pets, including special needs animals. Jensen attended Idaho and Boise State Universities. Her work has appeared in various print and online publications.

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