How to Keep Track of Laps When Walking

Many smartphone apps help you track your laps while exercising.

Many smartphone apps help you track your laps while exercising.

Whether you're taking a relaxing stroll along a path through a park or power walking around the track at the local high school, it's easy for one lap to blend into another. If you track the length of your workout by the number of laps you've completed, it's important to count your laps so you don't spend half your workout trying remember if you're on lap seven or eight. Several simple methods allow you to track your laps.

Lap Counter

Lap counters are simple devices designed to help athletes track their laps. The devices are available in a variety of styles but many attach to your waist or finger and allow you to increase the lap number with one click of a button. Lap counters are typically available at sporting goods or running stores.

Smartphone Apps

If you use a smartphone to enjoy music during your walk, download an app to help you keep track of your laps. Many such apps are available and with a quick tap of the screen, you'll never have to worry about your current lap again. Exercise-based apps often track your speed, distance and even the calories you burn during your workout.

Counting Games

If you want to keep your mind active during your walk, use a counting game to keep track of your laps. The games you can play with yourself are nearly endless, but the key is repetition. Instead of telling yourself "one" or "two" when you cross the start/finish line, repeat the number of the lap every 10 paces so it keeps fresh in your head. Another simple game is to name words that rhyme with the lap number; for lap two, think of words such as shoe, flu, do and screw.

Other Methods

If you don't mind carrying a small piece of note paper and a pencil, you can mark your laps on the paper each time you pass the start/finish line, and then put the paper and pencil in your pocket for the remainder of the lap. Another simple strategy is to place elastic bands on one wrist and transfer one band at a time to the other wrist upon completing a lap. If you have a friend or family member who wants to watch you walk from the comfort of a bench, have her track your laps with a pencil and paper.

 

About the Author

Toronto-based journalist William McCoy has been writing since 1997, specializing in topics such as sports, nutrition and health. He serves as the Studio's sports and recreation section expert. McCoy is a journalism graduate of Ryerson University.

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