How to Keep Protein Powder Fresh

Protein powder helps build muscles.

Protein powder helps build muscles.

Protein powder is used by bodybuilders and serious athletes to help build muscle mass. The problem is, it usually comes in large tubs that can make it difficult to ensure the powder stays fresh until you've used it all. Fortunately, a few simple storage techniques are all it takes to keep your protein powder fresh while you work your way through your supply.

Store protein powder in its original container. Keep the package in a cool, dry place, such as a cupboard or pantry. The optimal temperature is 70 degrees or below, so your protein powder will also stay fresh in the refrigerator.

Keep protein powder away from heat. Heat degrades protein powder and can cause it to go rancid or taste bad. Don't store protein powder in cupboards near your stove or oven, and don't keep it in a garage or other outdoor storage area, where temperature fluctuations can make the powder go bad.

Close the protein powder package tightly. Keeping the package tightly closed helps prevent moisture from getting into the powder, which can ruin it.

Use a dedicated scoop. You can use the one that comes with the protein powder or set aside a spoon for this purpose. Using the scoop or spoon for other foods can contaminate the protein powder, which can cause mold or bacteria to grow. Alternatively, wash the scoop or spoon with hot, soapy water if you use it for something other than the protein powder.

Use the protein powder before the expiration date. It's guaranteed fresh until that date, but after that, the powder can lose its flavor and begin to taste stale.

Tips

  • Read the storage directions on your protein powder. Certain brands might suggest storing it in the refrigerator -- if it contains natural oils, it can go rancid if kept at room temperature for long periods of time.
  • If you're not sure how fresh the protein powder is, it's probably best to toss it. Stale powder has a bad taste.
 

About the Author

Sara Ipatenco has taught writing, health and nutrition. She started writing in 2007 and has been published in Teaching Tolerance magazine. Ipatenco holds a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education, both from the University of Denver.

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