Jumpsoles Workouts

Basketball players use Jumpsoles to develop power and increase vertical leap.

Basketball players use Jumpsoles to develop power and increase vertical leap.

Jumpsoles are pieces of training equipment that you attach to your athletic shoes. They feature a thick platform at the balls of your feet so that when you wear them, your heels hang off the edge. They’re meant to be used when participating in the Jumpsoles training program, which consists of strength and power exercises.

Benefits

Participating in the Jumpsoles workout program develops strength and power in the major muscles of the lower body, thus increasing vertical leap and sprint speed. Wearing the Jumpsoles unit increases the amount of work your calves must do when you’re performing each exercise. Your calves plantar flex your ankle joint, which is one of the major joint movements that occur when you jump and sprint. Athletes who participate in sports such as basketball, volleyball, football and soccer may utilize Jumpsoles and its associated workouts to improve their performance.

Basics

The entire Jumpsoles training program lasts eight weeks. Because of their difficulty and intensity, workouts are to be completed two days per week with two days of rest in between to allow your muscles time to recover and heal. Prior to every workout, they recommend that you jog a quarter of a mile in regular running shoes of jump rope for two minutes in order to increase blood circulation and body temperature. In addition, a cool down period that consists of a quarter of a mile jog in regular running shoes should follow each session.

Exercises

Jumpsoles workouts consist of both strength and power exercises. The strength exercises they assign, including squat lunges and step-ups, are meant to be completed slowly and at a set cadence. Squat lunges are squats that are completed from the lunge position, with your feet in a staggered stance. Stepups require a sturdy box that is 8- to 12-inches tall. The power exercises, such as lateral cone hop, bounding, skipping, box jumps and rim jumps, should be performed as explosively or quickly as possible to stimulate power developments.

Strength Exercise Volume and Intensity

Throughout the eight-week program, the number of sets to complete of each exercise progressively increases. Squat lunges and stepups are the only exercises assigned the first week and consist of two sets of 10 jump repetitions. You maintain two sets of 10 jumps until you reach the fourth week, when you bump up the volume to three sets each. Rest one minute in between each set and exercise.

Power Exercise Volume and Intensity

The power exercises begin to be incorporated during week two. Lateral cone hop is to be completed for one set of 10 repetitions during the second and third week, and then bump up with two sets of 10 repetitions during the fourth through eighth week. Rest two minutes in between sets of lateral cone hop. Bounding begins on the third week, and you are to complete one set of 25 yards until week five, when you bump it up to two sets. Two minutes of rest is required between sets of bounds. Skipping begins on week two, where one set of 25 yards is assigned. On week four, bump up the volume to two sets of 25 yards, and on week eight, complete three sets. Rest just one minute in between sets of skips. Box jumps are incorporated during week three. Complete one set of 10 jumps during week three and four, and then bump it up to two sets for the rest of the program. Lastly, rim jumps, which begin during week two, are to be completed for just one set of 10 jumps that week before it bumps up to two sets on week three and throughout the rest of the eight week program. Because of how strenuous both box jumps and rim jumps are, rest four minutes in between sets.

 

About the Author

Kim Nunley has been screenwriting and working as an online health and fitness writer since 2005. She’s had multiple short screenplays produced and her feature scripts have placed at the Austin Film Festival. Prior to writing full-time, she worked as a strength coach, athletic coach and college instructor. She holds a master's degree in kinesiology from California State University, Fullerton.

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