Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Fish provides essential omega-3 fats without greatly affecting your blood sugar levels.

Fish provides essential omega-3 fats without greatly affecting your blood sugar levels.

Eating a lot of foods that cause spikes in your blood sugar levels may make you more likely to become obese or develop health conditions like heart disease or diabetes. But with a little planning, you can get all of your essential nutrients following a diet filled with healthy foods that don't cause your blood sugar levels to spike.

Lean Protein

Foods containing mainly lean protein don't spike blood glucose levels and may help limit these spikes when eaten along with foods containing blood sugar-raising carbohydrates. Healthy options include fish and seafood, skinless white meat chicken or turkey and soy products. Low-fat dairy products can be consumed in moderation, but these contain some natural sugars so they may have more of an effect on blood sugar levels.

Healthy Fats

While fats don't typically cause spikes in blood sugar levels, saturated and trans fats are unhealthy because they increase your risk for high cholesterol and heart disease. However, you need to include some healthy unsaturated fats in your diet. Get essential omega-3 fats from seafood and flaxseeds, and consider adding small amounts of nuts, seeds and avocados to your diet since these are nutritious sources of monounsaturated fats.

Foods High in Fiber

Since dietary fiber isn't digestible, it doesn't raise your blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that are high in fiber are digested more slowly, making spikes in blood sugar levels less likely. Beans, oatmeal made with rolled oats or steel cut oats, nuts and non-starchy vegetables are good choices for nutritious fiber-rich foods that aren't likely to cause large increases in blood sugar.

Low Glycemic Index Foods

When you eat carbohydrates, choose those that are low on the glycemic index, which measures how much a food increases blood sugar levels after you eat it. Foods with a GI of 55 or less are considered low on the glycemic index, and foods with a GI of 70 or above are considered high. Nutritious options include grapefruit, raw apples, raw carrots, beans, nuts, skim milk, oranges, mangoes, grapes, kiwi, peaches, plums, pears, barley, buckwheat, corn and peas.

 

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