How to Follow Up on an Online Application

Follow up on online applications using the same methods for printed applications.

Follow up on online applications using the same methods for printed applications.

Hiring employers might spend only a few seconds reviewing each application for a job opening. Anxious and eager applicants, in contrast, might have to wait a few days, a couple of weeks or longer to hear about the status of their submissions. Some human resources professionals and managers may need ample time to decide on which qualified applicants in a pool will move forward in the hiring process. Meanwhile, job seekers who are curious about their application submissions can follow up with companies in a respectful and professional manner.

Refer back to the original online job advertisement for application instructions, if possible. For example, if the company states in the ad "No Emails Please," make sure you don't use this method to follow up about your application. In addition, reference the title of the job opening as well as the requisition number in your follow-up communication.

Compose and send a short email to the company one day after submitting your online application. Obtain a company email address from the job advertisement or call and ask the receptionist for the correct email address for application inquires. Include the job opening's title and requisition number in the "Subject" field and the body of the message. Ask the company if it received your online application, using a professional business letter tone. In addition, ask the company if your correspondence should be sent by postal mail, instead of email.

Send another email one week after the first follow-up email, if you haven't received a response. Tweak your email message, asking about any potential mistakes made while filling out the application, or if there is missing or insufficient information. Refer to the hiring manager by name in the salutation, if possible: "Dear Ms. Jane Deerfield."

Transmit another email to the company 10 days after you submitted your original online application. Ask the recipient for the contact number of the hiring manager or another official in the company who screens applications. Ask to schedule a date and time for a brief telephone interview. Tactfully and professionally mention that you are considering other job offers. Attach your resume document to this email message, in case your original submission or upload in the online application process did not go through properly.

Tip

  • Create a new professional email address if your personal email address is too suggestive or vulgar.
 

About the Author

Damarious Page is a financial transcriptionist specializing in corporate quarterly earnings and financial results. Page holds a medical transcription certificate and has participated in an extensive career analysis and outplacement group workshop through Right Management. The West Corporation trained and certified him to handle customer support for home appliance clients.

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