How to Get a Flat Stomach Without Reducing Breast Size

Exercises that require balance strengthen your transversus abdominis.

Exercises that require balance strengthen your transversus abdominis.

Reducing your body-fat percentage can help you to obtain a flat stomach, though unfortunately the same action will also likely reduce your breast size. While spot-reducing is impossible, you can flatten your tummy by performing targeted abdominal strength-training exercises, none of which will alter your breast size. The key is to focus on the transversus abdominis, the deep-seated abdominal muscle that is responsible for pulling your stomach in toward your spine. Along with a svelte stomach and strong core, your posture will likely improve, which can help to enhance the appearance of your breasts.

Warm your body and muscles with five to 10 minutes of light-to-moderate cardio exercise before your abdominal-strengthening workout. Examples of efficient warm-up activities are jogging, walking and cycling.

Perform the Warrior III pose, which requires you to work and activate the transversus abdominis to stabilize your body in the single leg-balancing posture. Stand with an elongated spine and your feet hip-width apart. Pull your belly button in toward your spine and push your shoulder blades down your back. Press your left foot into the floor. Lift your right foot off of the ground and extend your right leg straight behind you; the right leg should be parallel to the floor and at hip height. Lean forward until your upper body is parallel to the floor as well. Extend your arms back alongside your torso. Increase the abdominal engagement if you are having trouble balancing. Aim to hold the post for 30 seconds. Repeat by balancing on the left leg.

Position yourself on your hands and knees to perform the Bird-Dog exercise, which strengthens your deep-lying abdominal muscles. Place your hands directly beneath your shoulders and your knees below your hips; point your fingers forward. Pull your stomach in toward your spine to protect and flatten your lower back and press your shoulders down and away from your ears. Raise your left knee off of the floor and extend the leg straight behind you, keeping it at hip height. Simultaneously lift your right hand off of the floor and extend it forward at shoulder height. Avoid looking up or down to keep your neck and head neutral. Feel the engagement in your stomach muscles; continue to pull your abs in to maintain your balance. Attempt to hold the lift for 10 seconds and then repeat on the other side for one full round. Complete five to 10 full rounds.

Stretch and elongate your stomach muscles after your workout by performing a standing backbend. Stand with your feet together, with your tailbone slightly tucked, your abs pulled in and your shoulder blades sliding down your back. Place your hands on your lower back, with your fingers pointing down. Press your hips and chest forward as you arch your back; allow your shoulders and head to move backward. Feel the stretch on the front of your torso, including in your abdomen. Hold for three to seven breaths and then release.

Items you will need

  • Exercise or yoga mat

Tips

  • Perform Warrior III and Bird-Dog in front of a mirror to ensure you are using correct form.
  • Train your transversus abdominis at least twice a week to maximize muscle development. Allow for 48 hours rest between sessions for recovery.

Warnings

  • Be aware that a reduction in breast size is possible with any form of exercise. Warrior III and Bird-Dog are not aerobic or anaerobic exercises, nor do they burn a significant amount of calories or fat, so it is unlikely that these exercises alone will result in weight loss or a decrease of breast size. However, you should take the entirety of your fitness plan into consideration if you are concerned about losing weight in your breasts.
  • Consult with your doctor before starting a new abdominal regimen. Tell your doctor if you have any injuries or medical conditions. Discuss your concern of losing breast size while exercising with your physician.
 

About the Author

Based in San Francisco, Beth Rifkin has been writing health- and fitness-related articles since 2005. Her bylines include "Tennis Life," "Ms. Fitness," "Triathlon Magazine," "Inside Tennis," "American Fitness" and others. She holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Temple University.

Photo Credits

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