Extending a Job Offer Letter

A job offer letter informs the candidate that the offer is official.

A job offer letter informs the candidate that the offer is official.

Finding the right candidate for the job can be time consuming, and even when the right candidate is found, it comes down to whether the person will accept the offer. Extending a job offer letter is a near-final step employers have to take before officially filling an open position. The manner and tone in which the job offer letter is written is essential to help secure the right candidate.

Timing

Before a job offer is extended to a candidate by letter, the candidate needs to be notified by phone. Make a verbal offer so that the candidate knows what to expect in writing, and what formal steps need to be taken to accept the offer. The verbal extension of a job offer also signifies to the candidate the sincerity of the employer. The job offer letter should go in the mail immediately after the call for arrival within two to three days.

Tone

The job offer letter should project the employer's enthusiasm for the candidate to join the organization, which will help set the tone for the relationship, according to an article from the nonprofit adviser company, the Bridgespan Group. Express excitement to extend the offer and your sincere wish that the candidate accepts and joins the company to be part of your team.

Content

Details of a job offer provided over the telephone must be reiterated in an official letter. It should cover the basics of salary, benefits, job title, any coverage costs for relocation, starting date of employment, and to whom the candidate will report. Provide instructions on how the candidate should respond to the job offer letter. In many instances, employers provide two copies of the job offer letter: one for the candidate and the other to be signed, dated and sent back to the employer.

Open Contact

In some cases, the job offer may not meet the candidate's expectations. The candidate might require a higher salary or have concerns over the employment start date. The letter should indicate a person the candidate can reach to discuss questions and concerns about the offer. Candidates don't always accept the offer as is; rather, negotiations often occur after the candidate accepts the offer.

 

About the Author

Wendy Lau entered the communication field in 2001. She works as a freelance writer and prior to that was a PR executive responsible for health care clients' written materials. Her writing experience include technical articles, corporate materials, online articles, blogs, byline articles, travel itineraries and business profile listings. She holds a Bachelor of Science in corporate communications from Ithaca College.

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