Exercises to Tighten the Buttocks Without Equipment

by Rob Hainer, Demand Media
    Several types of lunges get your butt tight and toned.

    Several types of lunges get your butt tight and toned.

    Making your favorite pair of jeans fit even better doesn't have to mean buying expensive equipment. Working out your tush doesn't require anything but your body weight — meaning you can get an effective gluteus workout pretty much anywhere. Many of the moves also work your legs, helping tighten your entire lower half. Holding in your stomach muscles as you work gets them involved as well, while still targeting your buttocks.

    Squats

    Squats focus much of the move on your rear end, making them ideal for firming your gluteus. To do the basic squat, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and push your hips back and down, as if you were about to sit in a chair. Bend your knees to 90 degrees, keeping them over your toes. Push up through your heels so your butt does most of the lifting work, and push your pelvis forward slightly to squeeze your glutes at the top of the move. Do two sets of 10. That's not your only option, however. Widen your stance for sumo squats, or keep one foot on your toe for balance as you push only through the other leg for single-leg squats.

    Lunges

    Pushing up through the heel is key to targeting your glutes when you're lunging. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and step forward with one foot, bending the knee to 90 degrees. Sink down and bend your back leg slightly. The wider your move and the deeper you sink, the harder you'll work. When you push back to your standing position, push from the heel of your front foot instead of the toe -- you'll feel this in your hamstrings and butt. Go for two sets of 10. When you're bored with the standard lunge, change it up by lifting and lowering straight up and down once you're in the lunge position, squeezing your glutes as you move. Pulse like this once with each lunge step. You can also try a walking lunge, where you step forward with your back foot instead of stepping back with your front foot -- push forward with your hips to stand to keep your tush engaged.

    Jumps

    Add cardio to your glute workout with jumps. Not itty bitty jumps, but powerful, vertical leaps are what you're going for. Bend your knees like you're moving into a squat, then push up through your toes to straighten your body and lift it off the floor. Raise your hands over your head as you jump to catch a bit more air. Jumps can take a lot out of you, so do two sets of five starting out, then increase the repetitions gradually. Need more of a challenge? Bring your knees up toward your chest as you jump rather than keeping your legs straight. Jumping over something can help you get your knees up -- start with something low, such as a couple of books, then add books to the stack to make it more challenging when you can.

    On the Floor

    A floor workout lets you take a bit of a break while still getting your glutes burning. Start with some supermans, where you lie on your stomach with your arms stretched over your head and your legs straight. Lift your feet and hands off the floor, moving as much of your arms and legs up as possible. Don't arch your back, and keep your glutes tight. Hold that position for 10 seconds, then release. Try 12 of these. Then, move onto some kickbacks. These aren't the financial kind, but you certainly see the rewards in your rear. Kneel on all fours, then lift one foot toward the ceiling, keeping your knee bent at 90 degrees. Move only your hip joint, and use your glutes to push your leg as far up as possible without arching your back. Do 12 reps with the left leg and 12 with the right. Add another set when you work up to it.

    About the Author

    Rob Hainer began writing and editing for newspapers in 1992. He began his career as a photojournalist in the Army, and studied journalism at the University of Missouri. He worked as a copy editor and reporter at "The Marietta Daily Journal," the "Spartanburg Herald-Journal" and the "New Haven Register."

    Photo Credits

    • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images