How to Easily Do a Handstand

Doing a handstand easily takes a lot of practice.

Doing a handstand easily takes a lot of practice.

Whether you are a training gymnast, in the circus or just trying something new, mastering a handstand takes practice. Doing handstands builds strength and body coordination. Some people even do them when they have a headache or to reduce stress, as they cause blood to rush to the head. By building strength and practicing easier exercises first, you can easily do a handstand.

Strengthen your arms. Doing a handstand requires strength, especially in the arms. Do 10 pushups every day. Once a week, increase the number of pushups by two.

Practice backbends. Stand up with your arms extended toward the ceiling and your palms flat. Slowly bend your back and push your hips forward as you bring your arms toward the floor behind you. As you bend back, keep your arms by your ears, bend your head back and look for the ground. Lock your arms. When your hands hit the floor, hold the position. Repeat various times daily until you are used to being upside down.

Master the headstand. Place a mat on the floor near a wall. Place your head flat on the mat. You should be looking at the wall. Lock your fingers and place them behind your head with your forearms flat on the mat. Place both feet onto the wall, forming a 90-degree angle with your body. Extend one leg into the air. Slowly lift the other leg into the air. Hold in place for 30 seconds.

Practice the Crow pose. From a standing position, do a squat with your knees together. Place your hands flat on the floor and your arms between your legs. Lift your body up by pointing your toes. Shift your weight to your hands, lifting your feet off of the floor. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat various times until you are comfortable in this position.

Do a handstand. Stand up straight. Tighten your abdominals. Bend down and place your hands flat on the floor right in front of your feet. As you are reaching for the floor with your hands, kick your right leg into the air toward the ceiling and point your toes, so your toes point to the ceiling. As you lift your right leg, bring your left leg slightly behind it with your toes pointed. Both legs should be straight, parallel and pointing toward the ceiling. Keep your head between your arms, looking slightly upward. Tighten your body, don't arch your back and push up through your shoulders.

Warning

  • Talk to your doctor before beginning any new exercises.
 

About the Author

Though constantly traveling the world, Julia Williams is based in Chicago and has been writing since 2006. Williams holds a Bachelor of Science in accounting. She is also a licensed fitness instructor, specializing in Pilates since 2003 and has written hundreds of articles on exercise and health.

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