How to Drink Vinegar Daily to Lose Weight

by Ireland Wolfe, Demand Media
    Apple cider vinegar purportedly helps treat a number of health issues.

    Apple cider vinegar purportedly helps treat a number of health issues.

    Apple cider vinegar is a natural remedy for many ailments. Because it contains potassium and other essential minerals, vinegar may help you feel less fatigued after a workout. Other natural vinegar uses include preventing indigestion, whitening teeth, relieving diarrhea and stopping hiccups. A more recent trend suggests that drinking apple cider vinegar before meals can reduce appetite and burn fat. However, no scientific research supports these claims. The Mayo Clinic states that while infrequent use of apple cider vinegar is safe, drinking large amounts of vinegar can cause throat irritation.

    Items you will need

    • 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
    • 1 cup of grapefruit juice or water
    • 1 teaspoon of honey (optional)

    Step 1

    Use organic apple cider vinegar when you can. Manufactures pasteurize non-organic vinegar, which causes the vinegar to lose much of the nutrient content.

    Step 2

    Mix apple cider vinegar into a glass of grapefruit juice or water. Dr. Oz recommends using grapefruit juice because of its high content of vitamin C. Vitamin C, according to Dr. Oz, helps you burn fat faster especially during exercise. However, you can also mix the vinegar into water if you prefer.

    Step 3

    Add a teaspoon of honey if the mixture is too tart. This only adds a small amount of calories but doing this will improve the taste.

    Step 4

    Drink this vinegar concoction before every meal.

    Tips

    • Don't drink vinegar without diluting in water or juice. It's very acidic and may erode teeth enamel and make your throat sore.
    • Keep in mind that successful weight loss involves reducing your caloric intake and exercising daily.

    Warning

    • Consult your physician before starting a new diet. Apple cider vinegar may interact with certain medications, such as diuretics and insulin.

    About the Author

    Ireland Wolfe has been writing professionally since 2009, contributing to Toonari Post, Africana Online and Winzer Insurance. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts in psychology and Master of Arts in mental health counseling. She is also a licensed mental health counselor, registered nutritionist and yoga teacher.

    Photo Credits

    • Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images