The Difference Between a Rebounder & Trampoline

Rebounders are smaller than traditional trampolines.

Rebounders are smaller than traditional trampolines.

If you're looking for a new type of workout regimen to follow and someone suggests a rebounder, it probably won't take you long to get accustomed to this exercise. That's because a rebounder is closely related to a trampoline, and many people have jumped on trampolines as children. The two devices are extremely similar in nature but have a few key differences.

Trampoline

Trampolines are significantly larger than rebounders and are typically meant for multiple people -- usually children -- to use at the same time. They often span 10 or more feet in diameter and have legs that hold them several feet above the ground. Trampolines usually include a protective fence around the perimeter to prevent someone falling to the ground during an errant jump.

Rebounder

A rebounder is a small trampoline built for just one person. Whereas trampolines are available in square and circular shapes, rebounders are typically circular and measure less than 4 feet in diameter. They work in the same way as a trampoline; you jump on a sheet of thin, synthetic material held to the frame with a number of springs.

Purpose

Although you can use a trampoline for a workout, the primary benefit of the item is as a recreational device. Whether it's a trampoline set up in your backyard or a series of trampolines at a recreational center, fun is usually the name of the game. A rebounder is designed for one person to use as a fitness tool. The goal of jumping on a rebounder isn't to get as high as you can or perform a gravity-defying trick, unlike a trampoline. Instead, it's to enjoy the activity's numerous health benefits.

Rebounder Benefits

Regular jumping on a rebounder provides you with a lengthy list of health benefits, including the strengthening of your muscles, ligaments and even your bones, according to Natural News. Jumping also helps drain your lymphatic system and improve the functioning of your lungs, all while providing a relatively low-impact exercise, compared to workouts such as jogging. If you use the rebounder for activities such as running on the spot or doing jumping jacks, you'll get a solid aerobic workout.

 

About the Author

Toronto-based journalist William McCoy has been writing since 1997, specializing in topics such as sports, nutrition and health. He serves as the Studio's sports and recreation section expert. McCoy is a journalism graduate of Ryerson University.

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