How to Deal With Insecure Employees

Insecure employees are often fearful of making mistakes.

Insecure employees are often fearful of making mistakes.

An insecure employee is often afraid of making mistakes and unsure of her job performance. When managing an insecure employee, learning to analyze and handle the issue at hand and making significant efforts to help the employee become comfortable and confident is crucial. Meeting with an insecure employee to discuss job expectations and find solutions to potential problems will ultimately help her become more productive in the workplace.

Schedule a time to meet with the employee to conduct a review. Explain ahead of time that you will be reviewing and discussing job expectations.

Bring up the insecure behavior. An employee may not be aware of the lack of confidence she is projecting.

Ask questions that lead to open communication. Does the employee feel she was thoroughly trained? Have job expectations been clear? These questions will give the insecure employee an opportunity to express her concerns or worries.

Highlight the employee’s strengths and explain to her how she can use those abilities to solve problems. Redirect the employee's anxiety and concerns in a gentle manner.

Review job expectations and answer any questions the employee has. Open communication will enable you to outline expectations and help the employee feel more confident in her role.

Establish a follow-up meeting or regular check-ins with the employee. The meeting or check-ins will allow you to acknowledge the employee's corrected behavior, discuss areas for improvement and hear any concerns or questions she may have.

Tip

  • Counseling or mentoring programs, if available at your workplace, can provide insecure employees with additional tools for success.
 

About the Author

Jennifer Kimrey earned her bachelor's degree in English writing and rhetoric from St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas. She's a regular contributor to the "Houston Chronicle" and her work has appeared on Opposing Views Cultures, The Austin American-Statesman, The Red Vault, The Western Vault and various other websites and publications.

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