How to Create High-Fiber Juice

Orange juice with pulp is higher in fiber.

Orange juice with pulp is higher in fiber.

Juicing fruits is a convenient way to get concentrated vitamins and minerals that help nourish your body. However, most juicers remove much of the essential fiber that is found in these foods. Fruits such as apples, oranges, lemons and berries contain soluble fiber, a type of fiber that attracts water, forming a gel in your digestive tract. The MayoClinic.com notes that all types of fiber are important for healthy digestion and also help to balance cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Make your juice even healthier by adding more natural fruit fiber.

Use a hand-juicer to juice citrus fruits. A hand-juicer has large holes that allow the pulp through. This increases the amount of soluble fiber in the juice. Juice 4 to 6 oranges or lemons to make fresh, fiber-rich juice.

Blend fresh fruits in a blender to make juice instead of juicing them. Wash and peel fruits such as apples, kiwis, peaches, watermelon or mangos. Blend the fruit until they are completely pureed. Add water or mix the fruit puree into your regular store-bought or fresh juice to add fiber.

Add a spoonful of ground flaxseeds to your regular juice. Mix thoroughly with a spoon; the flaxseeds will not dissolve completely, but will thicken the juice. Flaxseeds are rich in dietary fiber as well as essential omega-3 fatty acids that are important for heart, blood vessel and brain health.

Items you will need

  • Oranges
  • Lemons
  • Apple
  • Kiwi
  • Knife
  • Cutting board
  • Citrus press or hand-juicer
  • Blender
  • Wooden spoon
  • Jug

Tips

  • You can leave fruits such as apples and peaches unpeeled for even higher levels of fiber in your juice. However, this will make your juice thicker.
  • You can also peel and blend orange and lemon pieces to make a pulpy juice.
  • Add more water to dilute juice as needed.
  • You can use unsweetened orange juice concentrate to make juice; one cup contains 2.24 grams of fiber.

Warning

  • If you have any type of diabetes, consult your doctor or nutritionist before drinking fresh or store-bought fruit juices. Fruit contains natural sugars that raise blood sugar levels.
 

About the Author

Nadia Haris is a registered radiation therapist who has been writing about nutrition for more than six years. She is completing her Master of Science in nutrition with a focus on the dietary needs of oncology patients.

Photo Credits

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