How to Connect Exercise Bands to a Door

by Maxwell Payne, Demand Media
    Example of an exercise band.

    Example of an exercise band.

    Exercise bands are tools you can use to do resistance exercise and they are a useful alternative to free weights. They are compact, lightweight, and can connect to doors, railings, and other fixed objects. Bands come in different sizes and levels of resistance. When you use an exercise band, you must control and focus your body movements to achieve results through tension of the material when the band is pulled and released.

    Items you will need

    • Exercise band door attachment (example shown in Resources section of this article).

    Step 1

    Open the door slightly. Determine if you need to have the exercise band placed either above you for exercises such as pull downs or at waist level for exercises such as row pulls and curls. If you need the band positioned lower for height reasons or because you are doing exercises requiring you to lie down, you will need to use a door anchor attachment that connects to bottom of door.

    Step 2

    Place the safety stop end of the band door attachment in between the top of the door and top of the doorway for exercises that require the band to be placed high. For lower exercises, place the safety stop end of the attachment between the hinge edge of the door and the door frame where the hinges connect. For the door anchor attachment, slide one end of the attachment under the bottom of the door and close the door tightly.

    Step 3

    Close the door. Connect the band. Some bands have clips on the end to snap onto the attachment. If your band does not, loop one end of the band through the visible end of the attachment. Pull the loop through and place the other end of the band through the loop and pull tightly to secure it.

    Step 4

    Pull on the band from different angles to ensure it is securely in place.

    Warning

    • Remove the band when not using it so it doesn't get stuck in the door or become an accident hazard.

    About the Author

    Maxwell Payne has been a freelance writer since 2007. His work has appeared in various print and online publications. He holds a Bachelor of Science in integrated science, business and technology.

    Photo Credits

    • Keith Brofsky/Photodisc/Getty Images