Calling to Inquire About a Job

State your name and purpose of the call to each person you speak with.

State your name and purpose of the call to each person you speak with.

Calling to inquire about a job is a strategy that may or may not work. Some employers view calls as bothersome while others may see you as enterprising. In any case, there is no harm in calling but it should not be your only method of seeking information about a job.

Cold Calling

Because the employer is not anticipating your call, plan a strategy. Ask for the hiring manager or person who can give you information about open opportunities. If you have a name, ask for that person. When they pick up, politely ask if they have time to talk. Express interest in a position and state in one sentence why they should consider you. Ask if you can send your resume directly and thank him for his help.

Calling After Sending Resume

Call to inquire about a job approximately seven to 10 business days after sending your resume. Call the employer to confirm they have received your resume. This is also an appropriate time to ask about the hiring process, including next steps and time frames. You can also get the names of the recruiter and hiring manager who may be the people responsible for the next step.

Follow-Up Call After Interview

If you are granted an interview, then afterward establish the next steps. If you do not, you may be left wondering what the time frame is for completing interviews and getting the position filled. Though it is appropriate to send a written thank you note to whomever you interviewed with, if the interviewer gave you her card and said it's OK to follow up, make a brief phone call to express your gratitude.

Helpful Information

A few general rules will help you achieve success in your calls. Be professional and polite, even if the person on the other end is unhelpful, rude or too busy to talk to you. Strategize what you are going to say and be prepared to get nowhere. Document each call, taking notes of who you spoke to and when. Practice your calls in advance to polish up your phone skills. Have your resume present in case you do get someone who wants to discuss your qualifications on the spot.

 

About the Author

Francine Richards is a licensed multi-state insurance agent with years of human resources and insurance industry experience. Her work has appeared on Blue Cross Blue Shield websites and newsletters, the Houston Chronicle and The Nest. Richards holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications from the University of Maryland.

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