Bikini Bottom Workout Routines

Squats, lunges, deadlifts and bridging exercises all effectively target the butt area.

Squats, lunges, deadlifts and bridging exercises all effectively target the butt area.

Let's be honest -- a nicely toned and sculpted butt is the envy of many. A sculpted butt fills out jeans and makes bikini bottoms look good. But obtaining a tight, toned butt is not easy. It takes hard work, a clean diet and a workout program that hits your rear end from all angles. Perform the following workout as a circuit. Perform one exercise after the other with little to no rest in between. Keep the reps high completing 20 to 25 repetitions and run through the circuit three to four times. This workout will get you bikini-bottom ready and confidently flaunting that rock solid backside when it's time to hit the beach.

In/Out Squat Jump

The in/out squat jump will set your glutes, quads and hamstrings on fire. The wide squat will also target the adductors, or inner thigh, area. Begin with the feet narrow, approximately hip-width apart. Sit down into a squat position with the chest up and keeping most of the weight on the heels. When the thighs are parallel to the ground push through the heels performing a squat jump landing with the feet out wide. Sit back on the heels lowering the hips down toward the ground until the thighs are once again parallel to the ground then press through the heels performing another squat jump bringing the feet back together. Keep alternating the narrow and wide squat jumps for a total of 20 repetitions.

Barbell Step Up to Reverse Lunge

Another effective exercise for lifting and sculpting the glutes, hamstrings and quads. The height of the bench, or box, for this exercise should be around knee height. Stand in front of the bench with the barbell resting on the back of your shoulders. Place the right foot on the bench and press through the heel to step up onto the bench extending the hip and knee while maintaining a tall posture. The foot should face forward and be in line with the knee and hip. Slowly reverse the movement placing the left foot down lightly on the floor. Step the right foot off the bench and take it backwards behind the left foot straight into a reverse lunge. Press through the heel of the front foot to stand and return to the starting position. Continue alternating sides until all repetitions are complete.

Barbell Walking Diagonal Lunges

Diagonal lunges really target the outer area of the glutes as well as the adductors. Place a barbell on the back of your shoulders and start standing tall. Take a large step forward and out to the side at approximately a 45-degree angle bending both knees and lowering the hips toward the floor until the front thigh is parallel to the ground. Hips and toes should still be facing forward. Press through the heel and step up bring the back foot next to the front foot. Repeat this time stepping out with the opposite foot in the other direction. Continue moving forward and alternating legs.

Single Leg Bridging on Box

The single leg bridge on the box really targets the glutes and hamstrings and is a very effective butt lifting exercise. Lay on your back with the left leg bent and heel in contact with the box. The right leg remains straight. Push down through the heel and lift the hips off the floor until the thighs are in line with the torso. Squeeze your glutes at the top of the movement and then slowly lower back to the start position. Do not allow the spine to extend past the neutral position and try to avoid the pelvis from tilting as the hips are raised off the ground. Repeat for the required number of repetitions and then complete the exercise on the other side.

 

References

About the Author

Kristy Lee Wilson is a former Cirque du Soleil performer, Sharecare fitness expert, bestselling author, international speaker, certified personal trainer and youth fitness specialist. An elite athlete from a very young age, Wilson's ultimate mission is to motivate, inspire and educate as many people as possible to live life to their fullest potential.

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