How to Become a Video Game Director

Becoming a video game director takes years of dedication, experience and education.

Becoming a video game director takes years of dedication, experience and education.

Unlike films, video games don't have a reputation for being an auteur medium. That is changing, however, as many indie video game directors are emerging with cohesive visions for their games. The video game director, which can be the creative director or lead designer, is responsible for the creation of her game. As such, she oversees a large crew and ensures her vision for the game is implemented in every aspect possible. Many video game directors start off as designers, programmers or producers.

Education, experience are keys to landing director's job

Earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Game Design. Most directorial positions require at least a four-year degree.

Intern with a video game developer. Getting a position as a director requires experience in the industry on top of an education. Taking on an internship is a way to gain experience while you're still in school, and it's a great way to build contacts in the industry.

Make video games. Whether you are employed as a low-level designer at a small games company or completely on your own, it is vital that you build up a portfolio of games. Many of the most renowned indie developers today started off making freeware and flash games. Edmund McMillen, who went on to make Super Meat Boy for Xbox Live Arcade, is a perfect example.

Create a resume. Add your education, internship and all of the game projects you've been involved in. Add every game you have made, whether or not it was for a professional outlet, as game companies look for those enthusiastic about games development.

Work as a games designer or programmer for four to five years. This is the amount of experience most companies look for when hiring new directors.

Items you will need

  • Four-year degree in relevant field
 

Resources

About the Author

Johnny Kilhefner is a writer with a focus on technology, design and marketing. Writing for more than five years, he has contributed to Writer's Weekly, PopMatters, Bridged Design and APMP, among many other outlets.

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