How to Become a Professional Hair Stylist

Hairstylists can work at salons and spas or even be freelance stylists for fashion shoots or special events.

Hairstylists can work at salons and spas or even be freelance stylists for fashion shoots or special events.

Some people love to style hair in their spare time. They're often giving family members and friends hair trims, coloring their own hair, helping create updos for special events or flipping through hairstyle magazines. Hairstyling is a potentially lucrative career. With natural talent, proper training and a state license, someone who styles hair for fun can soon style hair as a career.

Take classes at local community centers or talk to a hair stylist to determine if you want to commit to schooling and a full-time career.

Enroll in a hairstyling school. Programs typically last about two years, but may be able to be completed in a shorter time. There are numerous hair styling schools and some community colleges offer cosmetology programs. Most hairstyling schools require a high school diploma or GED.

Earn your state board license. Typically, hairstyling schools will help you prepare and apply for the exam, which usually includes both a written and practical component.

Apply for a job. Equipped with the proper training and a state license, you can begin your job search. Some stylists begin as shampooers or hair assistants, then work their way up.

Items you will need

  • State board license
 

About the Author

Jennifer Kimrey earned her bachelor's degree in English writing and rhetoric from St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas. She's a regular contributor to the "Houston Chronicle" and her work has appeared on Opposing Views Cultures, The Austin American-Statesman, The Red Vault, The Western Vault and various other websites and publications.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images