How to Become an Advocate for Newborn Babies

Newborn babies need advocates to speak out on their behalf.

Newborn babies need advocates to speak out on their behalf.

Advocates support an issue or a group of people through their work. They use public speaking, volunteer work and even the creation of media campaigns to bring light to certain situations. Being an advocate for newborn babies is important because babies can only cry; they can't speak up for themselves. If you have a passion for newborns then advocacy may interest you.

Research

First, get clear on what area you want to focus on. Will you be focusing on a particular neonatal illness? Do you want to focus on abandoned newborn babies? You can check in with your local Department of Children & Family Services for up to date information. Also, speak with parents of newborns and others who recognize a need for newborn advocacy. A degree is not required for advocacy, but feel free to speak to willing college instructors for research and guidance.

Know Your Strengths

Advocacy requires action. Knowing what you do best will help you be a better advocate. Are you comfortable with public speaking? You could lead meetings and events about newborn babies. Are you skilled in graphic design? You could create fliers for upcoming events or media campaigns to catch people's attention.

Volunteer

Link up with newborn baby volunteer organizations. Make care packages to give to babies who don't have the essentials through groups like Newborns in Need. Go to local orphanages and nurseries and wrap your arms around a newborn who doesn't have a mommy around, with a group like Baby Cuddlers. You can also do this type of volunteer work on your own if you'd like.

Branch Out

You can find a paid advocacy position with several companies. Look for opportunities to work with companies like Zero to Three that focus on the importance of caring for babies. You can even check out local hospitals, day care centers or nurseries for opportunities. Want to start your own newborn baby advocacy program? Check out grants to fund advocacy startups on USA.gov.

 

About the Author

Christina Caldwell is a contributor for online publications such as Women's eNews and Little Pink Book. Her work has also been featured in the popular U.K. magazine "Black Heritage Today." Caldwell holds a bachelor's degree in marketing and communications.

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