How to Attach the Band on Swimming Goggles

The band is normally held in by a plastic loop.

The band is normally held in by a plastic loop.

Whether you're training for your fourth gold medal in the 100-meter butterfly or just want to make sure you don't step on anything sharp on the bottom of the local pool, swimming goggles allow you to see underwater while protecting your eyes from chlorine, salt or other irritants. The goggles are held in place by the head band, which may occasionally need to be replaced. Attaching the band to the goggles is an easy and straightforward process -- you've got this.

Lay your goggles flat on a towel or other soft surface to avoid scratching the lenses. Note the specific way the band should be attached to each end of the goggles. Most will feature a plastic loop that you can loop the band through, but different brands may have a buckle or clasp to hold the band in place.

Feed one end of the band through the back end of the plastic loop or buckle. Push through just enough that you can grasp the end of the band, then pull it until about 1 to 2 inches of the band is showing through the loop.

Feed the small part of the band that is sticking out back through the loop so that it is looping back on itself. Once you've achieved the desired length, secure the band with the small rubber ring on the band or snap the buckle or clasp into the locked position. Pull back on the unattached portion of the band to remove any slack, and repeat the looping process for the other side.

Items you will need

  • Towel

Tip

  • You will probably have to adjust the band after attaching it. Try the goggles on -- if they're too tight, loosen each end by pushing the very tips of the band back through the plastic loop to allow for more slack. If the goggles are too loose, push more band through each loop until you have a good fit.

Warning

  • Be careful not to tighten the goggles too much, as this could cause headaches or bruising around the eyes.
 

About the Author

Todd Maternowski began writing in 1996 as one of the co-founders of "The Chicago Criterion." He joined the local online news revolutionaries at Pegasus News in 2006, where he continues to work to this day. He studied religion at the University of Chicago.

Photo Credits

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