What to Ask a Talent Agent During an Interview

An actor needs an agent who can represent his best interests.

An actor needs an agent who can represent his best interests.

Scoring an interview with a talent agent is an exciting point in your career. Although you may be nervous to meet with this person, remember that you’re interviewing her as much as she’s screening you. It’s important to go into the interview with a list of questions, both to impress the agent with your diligence and to make sure you’re choosing the right person to represent you.

Use of Agency Name on Submissions

Ask the agency if you can use their name on your submissions. Including the name of the agency on your submissions may increase your chance of getting an audition with some companies. It’s important to know in advance if you can use the name of the agency or manager on all submissions or just those authorized by the company. Some agencies will allow talent they represent to use their brand name on all submissions, while others are selective with their brand image and only want to be associated with certain projects.

Type of Roles to Play

Question the agent on the type of roles she'll select for you. It’s important to be on the same page as your agent on the types of roles she finds for you. Explain the types of parts you’d like to play and the medium where you’d like to work, to see if she agrees this is a good fit. For example, if you want to seek out humorous sitcom roles on TV, but the agent thinks you’re a good fit for roles in big-screen dramas, you may not work well together.

Gauge Age Range

Inquire about what age range the agent believes you fall into. Although you probably already have an idea of your age range, it’s advisable to ask the agent what she thinks. If you’re looking for roles in film and TV, this is much more important than in theater. The agent may actually ask you this question before you get the chance to ask her, so if you’re able to get it right, you’ll be sure to impress her. It’s good to discuss this in the interview to ensure your role expectations are aligned with the agent’s plan for your career.

Determine Client Base

Ask what percentage of actors, singers and dancers the agent represents. You want to work with an agent that specializes in finding work relevant to your talents. It’s important to inquire about the other clients of the agent, to make sure you’re seeking representation from a professional with appropriate experience and connections. For example, if you’re an actor trying to get parts in movies, you don’t want to be represented by an agent who primarily works with singers.

 

About the Author

Laura Woods is a Los Angeles-based writer with more than six years of marketing experience. She has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from the University of Pittsburgh and an MBA from Robert Morris University.

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