How to Ask for a Raise in a Letter

Formatting your pay raise request in writing will show your boss your assertiveness.

Formatting your pay raise request in writing will show your boss your assertiveness.

Some employers offer periodic raises based on employee performance reviews. Other employers do not have a set schedule for raises. If you feel that you are due for a raise, it is acceptable to ask for one. If you put your request in writing, your boss can review it and make an informed decision. When asking for a raise in a letter, the key is to show your boss how much your presence is an asset to the company.

Avoid asking for a raise at the beginning of the letter. If you make your request at the beginning of the letter, your boss may not read the rest of the letter with an open mind.

Start the letter by emphasizing how long you have been with the company. Mention how you have enjoyed working in the position you have been assigned to. Do this even if you loathe the position. When seeking a raise, remember the old saying: You catch more flies with honey than vinegar.

State your accomplishments since you got your position. Include statistics and facts when citing your accomplishments. When your boss reads the numbers, he will also see how you have helped to increase company productivity.

Mention your performance reviews, especially if you exceeded the company's performance expectations. If you did not receive a raise after the performance reviews, mention this fact.

Say that another employer has offered you a job at higher pay, if this is the case. State that you would really rather keep your current position.

Ask for the raise last, but don't ask in a demanding way. Ask respectfully and in the tone of a suggestion. You can say, “At a time that is convenient for you, I would like to sit down and further discuss my contributions to the company as well as the possibility of an increase in salary.” A sit-down meeting gives you another opportunity to convince your boss that you deserve the raise you are asking for.

Refrain from asking for a specific raise amount in the letter. Asking for a specific amount reduces your chances of getting one. Wait until you sit down and talk with your boss before negotiating your raise amount.

 

About the Author

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images