10-Pound Dumbbell Workouts

Numerous 10-pound dumbbell workouts can be performed at home.

Numerous 10-pound dumbbell workouts can be performed at home.

Using 10-pound dumbbells are a great way to add resistance to your workout without putting too much stress on your body. Performing dumbbell exercises will help you gain muscle and lose fat; they also can be done from the comfort of your home. "Ladies’ Home Journal" recommends using weights two to three times per week.

Biceps Curls

Holding a 10-pound dumbbell in each hand, let your arms fall naturally to your sides, palms facing outward. Keeping your elbows close to your body, curl your arms so the weights come up to your shoulders. Lower your arms back to your sides; repeat. Do eight to 12 repetitions. You also can alternate arms instead of lifting both weights simultaneously.

Side Lateral Raises

Holding a 10-pound weight in each hand, stand with your arms at your sides against your body. Raise your arms to the sides, as if you were making a giant “T” with your body. Flex your deltoids at the top of the movement. Bring your arms back to your sides; repeat until fatigued.

Lunges

Standing with your arms down your sides, hold a 10-pound weight in each hand. Step your right leg about 30 inches in front of you. Support yourself by staying on your left toes and keeping your right foot flat. Bend your right knee until that thigh is parallel to the floor. Make sure to keep your knee over your ankle. Using your right leg, push back into starting position. Repeat eight to 12 times with each leg.

Triceps Kickback

Hold a dumbbell in your left hand. Place your right knee on a chair and lean over the chair using your right hand to balance. Keep your left leg slightly bent. With the dumbbell pointing toward the floor, extend your left arm back until it is almost straight. Return to start position, keeping your elbow close to your side. Repeat eight to 12 times; then switch arms. Throughout the movement, keep your left elbow close to your body and make sure not to lock your elbow once your arm is extended.

 

About the Author

Thomas Mitsos covers high school sports as the central desk reporter for MLive Media Group, where he has worked since 2009. He has also contributed to "Grand Rapids Magazine" and "Grand Rapids Family." Mitsos holds a B.A. in professional writing from Grand Valley State University.

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